New Facebook Strategy: Less Is More

New Facebook Strategy: Less is MoreFacebook’s organic reach and engagement (likes, comments, shares) continues it’s steady decline, begging for a new Facebook strategy. Part of the problem is the mind-boggling volume of content posted on Facebook. Getting your content seen is no mean feat. Statistics show every 20 minutes on Facebook there are:

  • 1 million links shared
  • 4.86 million photos uploaded
  • 763,888 status updates sent out

Conventional thinking says the logical Facebook strategy to beat the drop in organic reach and frequency is to post more often. The theory is, the more often you post, the larger your reach over time. Even if each post reaches an average of fewer people, the cumulative total reach would increase because you’re posting more content. Buffer put that conventional thinking to the test. What happened? The more often they posted, the worse they did!

That’s when Buffer decided to experiment with their Facebook strategy by doing something counter-intuitive. Instead of posting more content, they decided to post less and focus on quality over quantity. Buffer cut their Facebook posting frequency by more than half. The result was totally unexpected – their Facebook reach and engagement improved!

Not just slightly either. Reach more than tripled, and engagement more than doubled! Buffer also found more and more of their posts were reaching between 2.5x to 10x more people than before they decided to cut their Facebook posts by more than half.

To post or not to post…

The question is, if your new Facebook strategy calls for cutting your posts by half or more, how do you decide what stays and what goes? Buffer discovered that the content of everything they post on social media might not be right for Facebook. They did some research and concluded the best performing Facebook posts were either educational or entertainment based. Funny photos and GIFs would be good examples of the entertainment posts, while research data, “how-to” and infographics posts are educational posts. If you can somehow put together Facebook content containing both entertainment and educations components, that’s even better.

New Rule: 1-2 Facebook posts per day

With their revised Facebook strategy, Buffer is posting only once or twice per day. This means they have to select only the posts that best fit Facebook’s audience, while allowing Facebook to focus on delivering one post to their audience, instead of many.  Buffer believes by limiting the quantity of posts, it encourages a deep focus on posting quality and sends positive signals to the Facebook algorithm.

Curated content

Before adopting their new Facebook strategy, Buffer used to shy away from curated content because it didn’t directly impact their bottom-line.  Since they’ve changed their Facebook philosophy, Buffer has changed their mind. In recent months they found almost 2 out of 3 of their most successful Facebook posts were curated content.

While curated content may not directly affect the bottom line, it does play into improving Facebook reach, engagement and page growth significantly. Over time, this allows the delivery of homegrown content – content that does drive the bottom line – to a larger, more engaged audience.

Shifting more focus to brand awareness and engagement

Where they had previously focused on driving traffic to their website, Buffer’s new Facebook strategy concentrated on brand awareness and engagement. Buffer’s explanation for the change in philosophy was they had noticed a shift away from exclusively seeking driving traffic to a website to thinking about their content strategy as a whole – focusing on both direct traffic as well as engagement.

Buffer found that posting content designed to drive engagement only helps to build an activate Facebook audience. Overtime, that audience will go to you as a trusted source. Then, when you need to increase use of a product or service you offer, you have the opportunity to deliver a piece of brand content that helps move the bottom line.

If you decide to give the “less is more” Facebook strategy a try, please let us know if your results confirm what Buffer found or not so we can share it in a future post.

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